Human-Elephant conflict in the Southern Indian Nilgiri forest ranges

Mon, 2011-08-01 06:23 by sivaram · Forum/category:

Here's a website which gives an excellent idea of the Human-elephant conflict that happens with regularity in the Southern Indian Nilgiri forest ranges. These are the same ranges that houses ancient elephant corridors and which are under threat due to resorts constructed by many rich and powerful elite. (This is very close my current home-town of Coimbatore)

Unless more measures are taken to create viable elephant corridors in this zone, these kinds of conflicts (sometimes fatal to both human and pachyderm) are bound to escalate.

Here's the website.

http://www.kemmannu.com/index.php?action=highlights&type=230

Cynthia: I hope that I have posted this in the right forum.

Regards
Dr. Sivaram Hariharan
Om Shree Ganeshaaya Namaha
(Salutations to the elephant God Ganesha)

The right forum

Mon, 2011-08-01 13:18 by admin

I'm not Cynthia, but perhaps I can answer anyway.

Don't worry, if the message does not fit the forum, I usually shift it.

If you click on "Forums" in the top left navigation menu, you get a list of all forums, along with their purposes.

We do not get many articles on elephants outside the Amboseli area, so these articles can currently only go into the visitor forum. The "Miscellaneous" forum is still focused on the Amboseli area. Perhaps we should offer a global elephant forum.

Your webmaster Hans

[I will later edit this comment and remove the line it refers to in the original article above.]

Thanks

Mon, 2011-08-01 15:57 by sivaram

Thanks Hans. I'll keep this in mind the next time I think of posting something that may be of very great interest to elephant lovers all over. I hope I am not intruding in anyway with the main focus of this website, which is the welfare of the Amboseli African Elephants, by posting articles on Asian elephants.

But I sincerely feel for these Asian fellows here who are in a big war for their survival in an increasingly and rapidly urbanizing India.. and all in the name of so called progress.

The pachyderms are really suffering and are finding themselves increasingly constrained in forest islands, with increasing human habitation encroachment on their ancient migratory corridors. Even though some of the forest authority are trying their best for the elephants as U can see from the photos, I feel that the elephants are slowly losing the bigger battle for survival. To compound this problem is the usual politics of apathy and corruption that places the moolah over wildlife welfare.

This decade is crucial for the Asian elephants of the Southern Indian Nilgiri forest ranges... If their traditional migratory corridors are not saved, we could lose the Asian elephant from these parts of the world forever.

We need the Asian equivalent of a Cynthia in these parts, seriously.

Thanks
Dr. Sivaram Hariharan
Om Shree Ganeshaaya Namaha
(Salutations to the elephant God Ganesha)

A word about the Asian Elephant Habitat in times ancient

Fri, 2011-08-05 14:26 by sivaram

Just wanted to add an interesting fact about the Asian Elephant habitat in times ancient which was one giant ele-eco-sphere that stretched all the way from the verdant jungles of Kerala (India's southernmost state) which included the enchanting and pristine today's forests of Silent valley, Parrambikkulum, and Top Slip and through to the forests of the Nilgiris(blue eucalyptus forests) (Alas, this connection today between Top Slip and the Nilgiris is rudely interrupted by the city of Coimbatore where I reside). The Nilgiri eco-system, consisting of the forests of Ooty, Wayanad, & Masinagudi, then merged on to the forests of Mudumalai and Bandipur (all these forests are prime Asian elephant and tiger country even today) and then led to the magnificent Sandalwood forests of Nagarhole (another prime tiger habitat). This then abutted the jungles of the Deccan plateau of South Central India and then on to the scrub jungles of central India (the former home of the Asiatic lion which now only barely survives in the scrub forests of the Gir in Western India) and then on to the jungles of Northern India (the home of Kipling's famous Jungle Book) and the thick and beautiful jungles of the Himalayan foothills. From there on it lead seamlessly to the jungles of Kaziranga (the home of the endangered 1-horned Rhino and of course another prime tiger haven) in the Northeastern Indian state of Assam and other NE Indian states like Arunachal Pradesh and crossed over across to the rich evergreen towering teak jungles of Myanmar and Thailand and thence on the jungles of the rest of SE Asia. This was then the giant home of the Asian Elephant. This was also the original habitat of the Asian apex predator, the Tiger.

Those ancient times, a teenage tusker ejected out of its maternal herd at puberty by its herd females, say in the jungles of India's Southern most state of Kerala, could very well end up in the jungles of SE Asia over the course of its lifetime and even be back where it started and would have effectively dispersed its genes in this long sojourn.

Alas, today the this giant habitat has been minced to small islands of elephant and tiger sanctuaries due to increasing urbanization and encroaching human habitation. And this is the same story that has unfolded in Africa too where the entire continent was the giant home of the African elephant.

(How much I wish that I had a time machine and go back to those glory ancient days of the Asian elephant, reincarnated as a Tusker. What a life would that have been.)

Regards
Dr. Sivaram Hariharan
Om Shree Ganeshaaya Namaha
(Salutations to the elephant God Ganesha)

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